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Pityriasis rosea - Symptoms, causes, diagnosis, treatment

 

Pityriasis rosea is a rash that usually presents with small red, scaly bumps. It is sometimes called the itchy summer rash. The rash is caused by an infection in the skin and can spread easily to other areas of your body. Pityriasis rosea is more common in children and young adults, but can be found at any age group. Onset usually happens during the late spring or early summer months. The most common symptom of pityriasis rosea is a red rash that appears on a person's trunk followed by streaks of pink over their body, which will often become very itchy as they continue to spread elsewhere on the body as well as cause swelling around joints and muscles in areas such as wrists, elbows, knees, hands or feet.

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Pityriasis rosea symptoms:

The most common symptom of pityriasis rosea is a red rash that appears on a person's trunk followed by streaks of pink over their body, which will often become very itchy as they continue to spread elsewhere on the body as well as cause swelling around joints and muscles in areas such as wrists, elbows, knees, hands or feet.

Pityriasis rosea causes:

The cause of pityriasis rosea is a viral infection called Coendomycosis, which is usually caused by a type of fungus (Corynebacterium spp.) that lives in the skin. Coendomycosis affects between 1% and 5% of people at some point in their lives. The infection occurs because the fungus can enter into your body through small cuts and scratches on your skin, or through an insect bite. Pityriasis rosea may also be diagnosed when there are patches of very small and dispersed bumps that are found over the ears, neck, chest or back where there are no open wounds or rashes present. Pityriasis rosea usually begins as a small red rash on the trunk and spreads to the face, groin or other areas of the body. 

Pityriasis rosea complications:

The symptoms of pityriasis rosea may last for up to 6 weeks, but may also resolve on their own. 

Diagnosis:

To diagnose pityriasis rosea a medical professional will perform a physical exam, take a medical history and order tests to determine the cause. The physical exam will include checking your skin for any signs of blisters or rashes, swollen glands, swelling or tenderness in paired joints (e.g., knees or elbows), and feeling your lymph nodes, which can be enlarged when you have a viral infection. Additionally, the doctor will ask about the location and duration of pain due to muscle aches and joint pain.

 

Pityriasis rosea treatment:

Although pityriasis rosea usually resolves on its own and can be treated at home, you can use over-the-counter (OTC) anti-itch creams such as Cortaid or Hydrocortisone to relieve itching. Ibuprofen may also help to relieve itching, but consult your doctor first as it may worsen symptoms if taken with other medications or in combination with certain health conditions, such as heart disease.

The best treatment for pityriasis rosea is to refrain from scratching the rash. Anti-fungal medications can be prescribed by your doctor if the infection becomes worse.

At home:

Take OTC pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, to relieve joint pain, swelling and fever. Apply a fragrant-free lotion containing lactic acid to the rash several times a day. Scratching the rash can cause an infection to develop and lead to additional skin problems. Try not to scratch at all while you have pityriasis rosea and avoid using rough towels in the shower as it can cause a rash to develop on your torso, neck and face.

Pityriasis rosea prevention:

The best way to prevent pityriasis rosea is to avoid skin-to-skin contact with someone who has it, including people that have a cold, fever or have spent time in a hot environment. If you are in a room with another person who has pityriasis rosea, cover your own skin with clothing or use face masks and towels. Avoid wearing tight fitting clothing as they can cause rashes that may spread and itch. You can also use fragrant-free lotions, washcloths and clothing to keep the infected area dry during bathing.

 

Treatment of Coendomycosis Scalded skin syndrome:

Coendomycosis is a skin infection with signs of critical illness

Primary treatment (1st line) : Clotrimazole 100mg 1 day daily. Alternative treatment is Amprolium 2,5mg 1 tablet per 2 days. Prior and concomitant treatment in the same patient should include oral line antibiotics, preventative withdrawal of S -adenosylmethionine (SAMe), and fluconazole or ketoconazole not to exceed 200mg per day or metronidazole 200mg daily.

 

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