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Biology is the scientific study of living organisms. Its etymology comes from the Greek bios, meaning life or living, and logos, which meant knowledge. The word "biology" first came into use in 1747 when Carl Linnaeus used it to refer to the study of living things excluding plants. In 1822 Jean-Baptiste Lamarck put forth a theory of the transmutation of species: he believed that species could change over time as a result of natural adaptations to the environment or other external influences. The theory has been accepted and adapted by biologists, although it is not universally held to be true.
One of the most fundamental components of biology is the cell. In biology, cells are where all of life's processes occur within. The cell is essentially all of life, as it contains everything that is needed by a particular organism to function. The cell is made up of small organelles called "organelles" and a large nucleus giving it its characteristic shape. Within the nucleus is the genome which contains all of an organism's genetic information, including what proteins will be produced in certain conditions, or how an organism will grow to maturity in a certain environment. The third component of biology is the different types of cells. Cells are divided into three groups: prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and archaea. Prokaryotic cells are simple and small encompassing only a small area. Eukaryotic cells are more complex and contain organelles, within which a genome exists. Archaea are similar to eukaryotic cells except for two main differences: their cell membrane and their DNA structure.

-Organisms

Biology is the study of life from a broad perspective. However, modern biology focuses on two separate subfields of research. These two subfields are called biochemistry and cell biology.
Although biology has many different uses, one of the most important is to be able to understand life patterns and how they change or occur within living things. This can be useful in understanding disease patterns, which leads to the creation of medicines and treatments. In some cases it is also an important aspect in situations like crop breeding where a change in a trait is desired for a particular characteristic, for example an animal with a fast metabolism or less fat that can be used for food production. It is also used in both biotechnology and genetic engineering practice to produce new varieties of life forms by transferring DNA from one organism into another.
Another important area biology is used in is forensic science. Not long ago, forensic scientists started using microbiological cases, which has helped solve several cases. The most important benefit of using biology to solve crimes is because it must have been present during or before the crime had occurred to be useful, so knowing the source of the bacteria or other microorganism can help determine who might have committed a crime.
For a more detailed list go to: List of biologists
-Biology as a Profession
Biology can be studied on three levels: by professionals wanting to research and find cures for diseases, by students wanting to become teachers at secondary schools (middle schools and high schools), or by amateurs that are interested in the subject.


-Fields of Study in Biology

Biology is made up of many separate fields of study. These fields are the basis for all biological research. The majority of studies done in biology are subdivided into three main categories: animal biology, plant biology, and microbiology. However, there are several more specific fields that fall under these, for example zoology, botany, and microbiology. This subdivision allows for more detailed research to be performed by allowing more resources to be devoted to each individual field.

-Organizations for Biology Research

There are many organizations for biology research, and many of these specialize in a certain subject area. The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) was created by a group of scientists at a conference held in 1969. It is an organization that is dedicated to advancing public understanding of science, as well as improving the relationship between the general public and scientists. The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) was also created at this conference, and it works to identify issues related to scientific research that need attention, as well as making recommendations on how to solve these problems. It is composed of members that are elected to be part of the organization and they are considered the highest authority in biological science research. There is also an organization called the National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT) that has created a number of resources for teachers to better understand the science subject area.

-The Growth of Science in Biology

Biology has grown vastly over time, and there have been several major milestones for biology research. In 1876, Thomas Hunt Morgan began working with "Drosophila melanogaster" fruit flies as a model organism for his studies, leading to modern studies on genetics and heredity. The success of his work lead to other scientists using this model organism for their studies. In 1881, Robert Koch and Louis Pasteur, who were two of the most influential scientists in biology, each determined that a bacterium caused tuberculosis. They then discovered that a vaccine could be created from the bacteria, drastically reducing tuberculosis cases. Later in 1892, Alphonse Laveran was able to determine that malaria was caused by a parasite, which lead to research on how to treat malaria more effectively. In 1901 the discovery of X-ray crystallography led to revolutionizing DNA research by allowing DNA molecules to be studied in much more detail. In 2003 the human genome project led by Francis Collins was completed after 13 years of work with over 200 scientists; it is considered one of the greatest achievements of biology research. The Human Genome Project was a vast undertaking that involved many research scientists, including James Watson and Francis Crick who were two of the scientists who helped discover DNA's structure.


-Life Cycles in Biology

When studying biology, it is important to understand that life cycles are a very important part of Biology. Life cycles are the life cycles of animals or plants throughout the world including all of the different stages they go through. Life cycles are especially useful when there are concerns related to human diseases. For example, researchers can use these life cycles to find out what disease organisms cause in an animal or human body, as well as how long it takes for one organism to cause a disease before it becomes harmful to body systems. It is important for biotechnology and genetic engineering to study life cycles because it helps them to know how to regulate the growth of organisms.

-Classification in Biology

Classification is a large part of biology. The classification of living things is very interesting, since each organism has the same set of characteristics, such as what kind of characteristics does a human have? Are humans mammals? How about reptiles? What about birds? Each organism can be classified into different groups. The organisms are then divided into smaller and smaller groups until they are placed into their own group, or kingdom. For example, an oak tree and a snake would be under the same kingdom, which would be plants. They are then put into a smaller group, which is called the phylum, or the organisms that have similar characteristics. They would then be put into different classes. The classes that the oak tree and snake belong to are called Gymnosperms and Reptiles, respectively.

focal point

-Cellular Biology

Cellular biology focuses on all of the parts that make up a cell and how everything functions together within a cell. Cellular biologists are concerned with all of the subfields of biology and how they function separately and together in order to keep cells alive. It is important to understand cellular biology because these cellular processes occur within every living organism in order for it too survive.

-Molecular Biology

Molecular biology is the study of biological processes that occur on the molecular level. It is concerned with structure and function of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and protein. Understanding molecular biology helps to understand how life works at a much smaller level. Molecular biologists have helped in major events in biology, including the cloning of animals, plants and humans. Understanding cellular processes and DNA structure can be very helpful for diseases like cancer because it allows scientists to help understand how the disease spreads and what causes it to start.

-Ecology

Ecology focuses on interactions between organisms with their environment. Within ecology there are many subfields including behavioral ecology, evolutionary ecology, geographic ecology and population ecology. Ecology is important because it explains how organisms interact with the environment and how they survive in the environment. Without ecology there would be no food web in nature, which means that an entire ecosystem would collapse, destroying all of the plants and animals within it.
-The study of biological organisms and their interactions with their environment.
-Biology can be studied as a molecular science or as a holistic science. The molecular approach involves studying individual molecules, genes, and processes at the level of atoms and molecules. The holistic approach involves studying living systems (plants, animals, cells) at levels ranging from organs to populations to communities to ecosystems over time periods ranging from hours to years.
-Biology can be studied from an evolutionary and genetic perspective, as well as a molecular standpoint.
-Plants and animals are composed of systems (organs) and organisms.
-The study of genetics determines the heritability of organisms' traits, the permanence of traits, and the changes in traits over time. Genetics also studies DNA sequencing, molecular genetics, quantitative genetics and population genetics.
-Biology is the study of life processes at various levels such as physics at the macroscopic level or chemistry at the microscopic level. The study includes cellular biology, molecular biology, anatomy/developmental biology, physiology/biochemistry and ecology/behavioral biology.


-Biology deals with the structure, function and evolutionary history of organisms as well as the cells, tissues, organs and body systems of an organism.
-A study of how organic molecules are assembled into larger molecules or organelles (e.g., mitochondria).
-The study of the chemistry and physics of living cells, tissues and organisms. The discipline focuses on the chemical reactions that occur in cells to provide energy, maintain homeostasis, synthesize proteins and other important components of living things. The field also studies the physical elements that make up cells such as calcium ions—a major part of cellular function. Additionally there are other subdisciplines (e.g., cytology).
-A study of the anatomy, development and physiology of land animals.
-A study of how organisms extract energy from their environment and convert that energy into other materials (e.g., proteins, fats, carbohydrates) to fuel their metabolism and reproduce. The study focuses on how organisms acquire their energy and how they store it in sources such as food or protein in order to survive long enough to reproduce. It also studies mechanisms for storing energy from one generation to the next by sexual reproduction as well as mechanisms for repairing damage or regenerating lost or damaged cells, tissues and organs (e.g., regeneration).
-A biologically based approach that links particular aspects of biology with physical, chemical & mathematical principles. This approach gives scientists and engineers a comprehensive framework to use in their work.
-The study of DNA, the genetic material of all living organisms.
-A study of how information is transmitted from one generation to the next in living organisms.
-The study of food chains and food webs, which are organized networks in which different species depend on each other for survival. The focus is on how an organism's population changes over time due to predation and competition with other organisms or other populations, or because a given organism dies out. These relationships can vary from species that eat each other to species that feed on smaller consumers such as smaller mammals. In ecosystems, these connections are altered by weather (e.g. droughts or floods), climate change, and other environmental factors.
-A study of how one species' reproductive process affects the population dynamics of other species within the same environment.
-The study of how organisms are affected by their environment, including food and light (e.g., natural selection).
-Study of the ecology of populations of organisms as they interact with one another and their environment.
-Study of the interactions between organisms and the physical, chemical and biological components in their environments that affect development and survival.

Microbiology is a branch that is concerned with all microorganisms including bacteria, protozoa, algae, fungi, etc. In this respect, microbial ecology and biogeochemistry is a study of the interactions between organisms. Industrial microbiology is the study of microbes that impact the quality and safety of foods, consumer goods, pharmaceuticals, or other products that are produced by industrial processes. Applied microbiology includes medical science, environmental science and biotechnology.

-Life consists primarily of prokaryotic cells. The prokaryotes play a major role in carbon dioxide production and storage and have been implicated in marine carbon dioxide sequestration. Prokaryotes are autotrophic (self-generating) organisms that can contribute to oceanic acidification concerns. Prokaryotes have been shown to account for as much as half of all microbial production in the oceans.
-The study of the preservation or extinction of species or biota under changes in physical conditions and environment.
-The study of global warming that is caused by increases in greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) primarily from industrial activities. Global warming results in increased sea levels, extreme weather, melting glaciers and polar ice caps, effects on biodiversity and disease patterns, ecosystem collapses and decreased food security—all of which may lead to human deaths.
-The study of how living cells use energy from food to synthesize molecules and organelles. Examples include the photosynthetic reaction center that provides energy for the synthesis of sugars from glucose using carbon dioxide and water, or energy in mitochondria that is used for ATP synthesis.
-An intensive field study on a single species in order to better understand its ecology, behavior and evolution. These type of studies are important to improve conservation efforts and devise strategies to protect biodiversity such as preserves.
-The study of the complex interactions that occur between organisms or among different species within an ecosystem in which organisms are dependent on each other for survival. Ecosystems include plants, animals, soil organisms and microbes. An ecosystem is an altered natural environment where certain species or populations depend on other members of the community for survival.
-The study of food chains and food webs and their effects on biomes and ecosystems - Food chains and food webs are organized networks in which different species depend on each other for survival. Food chains and food webs can vary from predators eating smaller invertebrates, to producers that eat other producers, to parasitic species that rely on hosts for energy or nutrients. Ecosystems are highly complex and dependent on the interactions between organisms within their environment.
-A study of the health of an organ (organisms) inside an organism such as a human body, plant or animal body.
-The study of the biomechanical behavior of organisms that includes its structure, function and development.
-The study of the effect on marine life due to chemical pollution in both fresh water and seawater.
-The study of how a species adapts to changes in its environment (either physical or chemical) such as a change in temperature, acidity or salinity. The effects on a species can be detrimental if they do not have the ability to adapt quickly enough to these changes (e.g., coral reefs).
-The study of how a species reacts to different environmental factors such as water temperature, low dissolved oxygen concentrations and increased nutrients from sewage runoffs.
-A study of the effects we humans have on the environment. The effects of pollution and climate change will cause extinction of many species.
An interdisciplinary field that includes such things as economics, politics, sociology, and technology in a variety of areas. Contemporary environmental issues include air pollution and global warming. Also called eco-politics. Examples are: water quality, nuclear waste disposal, ozone layer depletion, global warming (human induced), biodiversity loss and endangered species loss in the U.S., pollution from chemical industries which affects health and the environment worldwide (including plastics garbage).
-The study of how organisms interact together by killing off the dominant species to promote the survival of another that is less competitive. An example of competition between species is that if one population is too dense, it will reduce the numbers or individuals in another population by either predation or disease. Predation can be considered to be a form of biotic or abiotic competition because they both limit population sizes through natural selection.
-The study of how an organism adapts to a changing environment, which can be due to climate change, pollution or increased human populations that create environmental stresses. Organisms are able to cope with changing environmental conditions due to behavioral adaptations, genetic changes and/or physiological changes. Organisms can evolve relatively quickly to adapt to environmental changes.
-The study of how organisms interact with each other and their environment, from single celled organisms to even entire ecosystems. This includes behaviors such as food webs and predator-prey relationships that occur between species.
-The study of how an organism interacts with its physical environment (e.g., water temperature, salinity and pH) that it must live within in order to survive. These interactions can have a significant impact on survival, growth, development and reproduction of an organism.
-The study of the population dynamics of a species within an environment, including birth, growth rate and death of organisms within a food chain or ecosystem. Population ecology also involves understanding how species adapt to changes in their environment or how they may change the environment around them.
-The study of the impacts human activities have on an ecosystem which include water contamination by sewage, industry and agriculture; air pollution caused by factories, automobiles and other sources; loss of biodiversity due to habitat destruction from urban construction or deforestation; waste management; overfishing; and loss of natural water supply for growing populations due to dams.
-The study of the ways in which organisms interact with each other and their environment in order to survive. It involves understanding how they function such as reproduction, feeding, defense and survival. Ecological successions are defined by succession on the basis of linkages between biotic populations, methods by which they are linked and how these linkages affect the successional process. Succession is a term used to describe the changes that occur in ecosystems over time as populations become more and more diverse and change resulting from external forces such as humans or other species
-The study of predation that includes all interactions between species such as competition for food, predation on other species or predation on habitat or predators themselves. Predation is an important component of natural selection and can be a source of competition between species.
-The study of how organisms interact with the physical environment in which they live such as water, air and the soil. This includes how organisms are affected by temperatures and weather conditions they live in. Ecosystem ecology is a subset of environmental science that focuses on interactions between populations and their environment across multiple levels (e.g., within a coral reef or fresh water system).
-The study of organisms that are dependent or have become reliant on humans for food or shelter (commensalism) or those that are dependent upon humans for their survival (mutualism). (e.g. plankton, coral reefs, some species of birds)

-The study of how humans affect the environment. For example, the effects on animals and plants as a result of climate change or environmental pollution. It also involves understanding how people influence their surroundings as a result of their domestic and industrial activity such as deforestation (Brazil), over-fishing (Indonesia) and overpopulation (Indonesia).
-The study of the interactions between organisms in order to achieve success. Successful interactions happen when an organism is able to survive and reproduce from one generation to the next. When interactions are successful, an individual's fitness will increase due to this interaction with another organism.

-The study of how human activity can impact an ecosystem. It involves understanding how humans influence the environment (e.g., deforestation, overfishing) and learning how to balance human needs with nature's needs.
-The study of how organisms interact with each other and their environment in order to survive. It involves understanding how they function such as reproduction, feeding, defense and survival. Ecological successions are defined by succession on the basis of linkages between biotic populations, methods by which they are linked and how these linkages affect the successional process. Succession is a term used to describe the changes that occur in ecosystems over time as populations become more and more diverse and change resulting from external forces such as humans or other species
-The study of predation that includes all interactions between species such as competition for food, predation on other species or predation on habitat or predators themselves. Predation is an important component of natural selection and can be a source of competition between species.
-The study of how organisms interact with the physical environment in which they live such as water, air and the soil. This includes how organisms are affected by temperatures and weather conditions they live in. Ecosystem ecology is a subset of environmental science that focuses on interactions between populations and their environment across multiple levels (e.g., within a coral reef or fresh water system).
-The study of organisms that are dependent or have become reliant on humans for food or shelter (commensalism) or those that are dependent upon humans for their survival (mutualism). (e.g. plankton, coral reefs, some species of birds)

-The study of how humans affect the environment. For example, the effects on animals and plants as a result of climate change or environmental pollution. It also involves understanding how people influence their surroundings as a result of their domestic and industrial activity such as deforestation (Brazil), over-fishing (Indonesia) and overpopulation (Indonesia).

The study of structure and function at the microscopic level, typically using a microscope. Structural biology focuses on features that are too small to see with the naked eye including proteins, DNA, carbohydrates and fats. Structural biology is closely linked to the field of genetics because the main methods used in structural biology require genetic information.
-The study of how life began on Earth and how different species evolved. For example, a paleontologist may study how dinosaurs evolved and why some species disappeared.

-The study of the origin, evolution and distribution of animals. Paleoecology refers to the ecology of ancient times. Biomechanics is the study of anatomy, especially living animals, including their structure and function.

-Any analysis that uses mathematics to describe and predict patterns in nature or society. It is used to solve problems and answer questions using logic and rational thought processes. The analysis involves using different formulas or equations based on knowledge in order to reach an answer.

-The use of statistical methods to test hypotheses is used in biology with regards to evolution, genetics and epidemiology studies, for example. Data are collected and analyzed to determine whether a hypothesis is correct or not. One of the most common statistical techniques used by biologists is called a t-test, which is used to compare samples. Scientists use statistics to provide evidence when arguing for or against a particular hypothesis.

-The study of how organisms interact with their environment in order to survive. It involves understanding how they function such as reproduction, feeding, defense and survival. Ecological successions are defined by succession on the basis of linkages between biotic populations, methods by which they are linked and how these linkages affect the successional process. Succession is a term used to describe the changes that occur in ecosystems over time as populations become more and more diverse and change resulting from external forces such as humans or other species

-The study of predation that includes all interactions between species such as competition for food, predation on other species or predation on habitat or predators themselves. Predation is an important component of natural selection and can be a source of competition between species.

-The study of how organisms interact with the physical environment in which they live such as water, air and the soil. This includes how organisms are affected by temperatures and weather conditions they live in. Ecosystem ecology is a subset of environmental science that focuses on interactions between populations and their environment across multiple levels (e.g., within a coral reef or fresh water system).

-The study of organisms that are dependent or have become reliant on humans for food or shelter (commensalism) or those that are dependent upon humans for their survival (mutualism). (e.g. plankton, coral reefs, some species of birds)

-The study of how humans affect the environment. For example, the effects on animals and plants as a result of climate change or environmental pollution. It also involves understanding how people influence their surroundings as a result of their domestic and industrial activity such as deforestation (Brazil), over-fishing (Indonesia) and overpopulation (Indonesia).
Scoring Definitions for ASVAB AFQT Sample Practice Tests Information about the various scales used to score the ASVAB: Standard Scores Factor Scores Test Scores.
major biology

ASVAB Test Information & Scoring Questions


What is the ASVAB?

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery or ASVAB is an aptitude test that measures skills necessary for you to succeed in your military career. The test consists of verbal, math, science, reading and writing section subtests. The ASVAB is used to determine whether you have the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in each military career path (every job in every military occupation) within the Armed Services.

What is a Standard Score?

A standard score indicates how well you did on a test compared to others who took the same test. A standard score is expressed as a percentile and can be from 0-1 (low), 50-60 (average), or 100-200 (high). The percentage indicates how many people scored lower than your score, while the number of people who scored higher than your score and the percent of people who were better than you is represented by the positive number. For instance, if you scored better than 70% of the people who took the ASVAB, your score would be considered to be above average.

What is a Factor Score?

A factor score describes how well you did compared to others in similar situations, based on how well you scored on different subtests and combined into an index. For example, if you scored higher in Word Knowledge (WK) and Mathematics Knowledge (MK) than 73% of people taking the test and it was combined into a WK-MK factor score with a number from 1-99 to indicate your performance level. The military determines your ASVAB scores based on this factor score.

What is an AFQT Score?

The Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) is used to determine a job qualification for enlistment in the Armed Forces. Qualifying scores are set for each military job. Scores from the ASVAB can be used to determine up to two years of active military service. Score ranges are created by each branch of service and may vary within each branch based on your career field or position within that branch. The all-encompassing AFQT score is out of 100 and is divided by your scores from the other sections of the test.

AFQT Score Chart (E-Services) Scoring Definitions for ASVAB AFQT Sample Practice Tests Information about the various scales used to score the ASVAB: Standard Scores Factor Scores Test Scores.


Testing Information About the ASVAB


The ASVAB is a timed test that measures your skills in a number of areas. You complete questions that show you either know or do not know the answer to the question. Your scores on each section of the test are totaled up and converted into a scaled score. This scaled score is then used to determine whether or not you pass certain military qualification requirements. The maximum score is 1,000.

How many test questions are on the ASVAB? 

There are four sections that make up the ASVAB. Usually there are 100 questions on each section, but this number can vary from 25-125 depending on the time you take. Depending on where you live, there may also be additional tests for various positions or specialties that aren't required for basic training.

How long does it take to complete the ASVAB?

The overall test takes 60 to 75 minutes. This includes the ASVAB test and breaks up into multiple sections. Depending on how you take the test, some of these sections may not be timed as others are timed. Your recruiter will tell you when each section is timed.
How do I register for the ASVAB or a particular sub-test? You must register for a given sub-test through an authorized military recruiter, preferably within one month of taking the test. As of November 2002, all registered Test takers can receive their results instantly through an online score report via the American Services Testing Registration (ASTRA) system and CDs in the mail. This is called E-Testing.

Can I take the ASVAB without enlisting in the military?

If you are interested in joining the military and taking the ASVAB to see how you stack up, contact your local recruiter for more information, or go straight to your nearest Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS). You can also visit Military.com's ASVAB Information Center for more information or talk to a recruiter at these military recruiting locations. Additional information is available at EAS as well.

Do high school students have to take the ASVAB?

Under certain circumstances, yes, high school students may have to take it. High schools with internet access may occasionally offer test-taking opportunities. Students are encouraged to contact their local high schools to learn about opportunities for taking the test if they have not yet taken it themselves.

What do you mean by "easy" or "hard"?

The ASVAB is scored on a scale of 1 to 99, with higher numbers representing better performance. A percentile score is the percentage of people who scored lower than this number (e.g., those scoring in the 50th percentile) and a scaled score is the point that places you in that group (e.g., an 85% percentile scale score means you scored better than 85% of all test takers). Percentile scores are based on the mean of all test takers. Standard scores are based on the distribution of scores, and they're easier to understand than scaled scores. On the ASVAB subtests, a standard score of 50 is average (that is, half of the participants will score below that number and half will score above it). A standard score of 60 means that you scored higher than 60 percent of other test takers.

How do I register for the ASVAB or a particular sub-test?

You must register for a given sub-test through an authorized military recruiter, preferably within one month of taking the test. As of November 2002, all registered Test takers can receive their results instantly through an online score report via the American Services Testing Registration (ASTRA) system and CDs in the mail. This is called E-Testing.

Can I take the ASVAB without enlisting in the military?

If you are interested in joining the military and taking the ASVAB to see how you stack up, contact your local recruiter for more information, or go straight to your nearest Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS). You can also visit Military.com's ASVAB Information Center for more information or talk to a recruiter at these military recruiting locations. Additional information is available at EAS as well.

Do high school students have to take the ASVAB?

Under certain circumstances, yes, high school students may have to take it. High schools with internet access may occasionally offer test-taking opportunities. Students are encouraged to contact their local high schools to learn about opportunities for taking the test if they have not yet taken it themselves.

What do you mean by "easy" or "hard"?

The ASVAB is scored on a scale of 1 to 99, with higher numbers representing better performance. A percentile score is the percentage of people who scored lower than this number (e.g., those scoring in the 50th percentile) and a scaled score is the point that places you in that group (e.g. an 85% percentile scale score means you scored better than 85% of all test takers). Percentile scores are based on the mean of all test takers. Standard scores are based on the distribution of scores, and they're easier to understand than scaled scores. On the ASVAB subtests, a standard score of 50 is average (that is, half of the participants will score below that number and half will score above it). A standard score of 60 means that you scored higher than 60 percent of other test takers.



How do I register for the ASVAB or a particular sub-test?

You must register for a given sub-test through an authorized military recruiter, preferably within one month of taking the test. As of November 2002, all registered Test takers can receive their results instantly through an online score report via the American Services Testing Registration (ASTRA) system and CDs in the mail. This is called E-Testing.

Can I take the ASVAB without enlisting in the military?

If you are interested in joining the military and taking the ASVAB to see how you stack up, contact your local recruiter for more information, or go straight to your nearest Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS). You can also visit Military.com's ASVAB Information Center for more information or talk to a recruiter at these military recruiting locations. Additional information is available at EAS as well.

 

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