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ِAll about Gastrointestinal Diseases

 

Gastrointestinal diseases affect the gastrointestinal tract which is the part of the body responsible for digestion. The term "gastrointestinal" refers to the stomach and intestines, as well as the liver, pancreas, and other organs that have digestive functions. Diseases can range from minor nuisance cases to life-threatening conditions such as pancreatitis or colorectal cancer.

Gastrointestinal Diseases

If you're wondering about any gastrointestinal issues you're experiencing, this post should help you understand what may be causing it and how it might be treated!

What are gastrointestinal diseases?

Gastrointestinal diseases affect the gastrointestinal tract which is the part of the body responsible for digestion. The term "gastrointestinal" refers to the stomach and intestines, as well as the liver, pancreas, and other organs that have digestive functions. Diseases can range from minor nuisance cases to life-threatening conditions such as pancreatitis or colorectal cancer.

What causes GI symptoms?

Examples of gastrointestinal diseases includes ulcers, food allergies, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While some GI problems are quite simple to manage, others can be life-threatening if left untreated.

Gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology

The digestive system is made up of several organs that all play a vital role in the breakdown of foods, absorption of nutrients and elimination of waste.

Digestive system diseases and disorders:

Digestive system disease is often associated with signs and symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain or cramping, diarrhea or constipation. See your doctor if you have symptoms that are persistent or severe, or if the symptoms are accompanied by fever, blood in the stool or other signs of complications. Some gastrointestinal problems can be quite serious on their own. Others can be signs that there's something more serious going on elsewhere in your body.

What are functional gastrointestinal diseases?

Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are a group of conditions characterized by chronic symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating and altered bowel habits in the absence of known structural or biochemical abnormalities. Some common FGIDs are irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), spastic colon and functional constipation.

What causes functional gastrointestinal diseases?

A functional disorder is one that has no definite physical cause after all possible physical illnesses have been ruled out by the doctor. These disorders often respond to changes in your diet or lifestyle and can usually be easily treated with medications that are readily available.

How to identify a functional gastrointestinal disorder?

A functional GI disorder can be very similar in symptoms to irritable bowel syndrome, but it may be more severe or chronic, and last much longer. The most common function is often that of stress and anxiety causing the pelvis to protrude.

The effects of stress on your health are well known and are very relevant here. When we become stressed or under pressure the body produces adrenaline, which triggers the release of stress hormones (such as cortisol) when you are under pressure, and inflammation occurs in your digestive tract. As a rule, inflammation is bad for you. It is intimately involved with all the diseases of aging, and is at the heart of every modern degenerative disease. It is also a cause of pain and discomfort.

The digestive system disorders discussed in this section may be caused by diet, viruses or bacteria, medications, and a number of other factors. Learn more about their causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment courses below.

What are gastrointestinal disease symptoms?

Some symptoms can include abdominal pain or cramping, nausea and vomiting. Other signs that you should see your doctor include blood in your stool or weight loss.

What are functional gastrointestinal diseases symptoms?

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an incurable disorder where you experience uncontrollable bouts of abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea or constipation. In IBS your gastrointestinal system's normal response to stress and anxiety can be disrupted. This condition can cause significant discomfort and interfere with your daily life. IBS affects women and men of all ages. While most people with IBS are diagnosed in their 30s, it has been referred to as "The Great Imitator" because the chief complaints mimic other diseases or conditions.

What are the various types of gastrointestinal diseases?

The types of gastrointestinal diseases include:

1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

2. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

3. Functional dyspepsia

4. Functional constipation

5. Celiac disease and the gluten-free diet

6. Crohn's disease and the gluten-free diet

7. Rundblätterkrankheit (RK) or pseudotumor cerebri, or "pseudotumor cerebelli" ("tumor of the posterior fossa")

8. Obesity in the elderly

9. Gastritis, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric cancer

10. Gastroenteritis and gastroenteritis-associated enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (HGE-E coli) syndrome

11. Portal hypertension (PPHN)

12. Colorectal cancer (CRC)

13. Inflammatory bowel disease and ulcerative colitis

14. Ulcerative colitis – Endoscopy and biopsy

15. Crohn's disease – Endoscopy and biopsy

16. Irritable bowel syndrome

17. Functional dyspepsia

18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

19. Diverticular disease

20. Food poisoning

21. Gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying)

22. Neurologic gastrointestinal diseases and disorders. 

What are the GI symptoms in children?

What are the different types of gastrointestinal diseases that affect children and adolescents? 

1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children

2. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in children and adolescents

3. Functional dyspepsia in children and adolescents

4. Functional constipation in children and adolescents

5. Celiac disease and the gluten-free diet in children

6. Crohn's disease and the gluten-free diet in children

7. Rundblätterkrankheit or "pseudotumor cerebri" or "pseudotumor cerebelli" ("tumor of the posterior fossa")

8. Obesity in children and adolescents

9. Gastritis, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric cancer in children

10. Gastroenteritis and gastroenteritis-associated enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (HGE-E coli) syndrome in children

11. Portal hypertension (PPHN) in children

12. Colorectal cancer in childhood

13. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and ulcerative colitis in childhood

14. Ulcerative colitis – Endoscopy and biopsy of the colon

15. Crohn's disease – Endoscopy and biopsy of the colon

16. Irritable bowel syndrome in children

17. Functional dyspepsia in children

18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children

19. Diverticular disease of the colon and sigmoid colon

20. Food poisoning in children

21. Gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying) in children

22. Neurologic gastrointestinal diseases and disorders in children.

What are the gastrointestinal diseases Treatment?

To treat some of these GI symptoms, you may need to see a healthcare professional. This could be a doctor or other health professional such as a nurse. It is important that you practice preventative measures to avoid bacterial overgrowth and other gastrointestinal diseases from developing. This will require changes in the way you eat, exercise and handle stress. Ask your doctor if there are any medications associated with GERD that suit your needs.

What are structural gastrointestinal diseases?

Narrowing of the esophagus may prevent food and liquids from moving down into the stomach. This condition can cause heartburn. Narrowing of the esophagus is often caused by scar tissue or thickened muscle tissue that forms after a number of acid reflux episodes. Many people who experience GERD have narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter, a band of muscles in the lower part of your stomach that connects your esophagus to your stomach.

 

People who have narrowing of the esophagus often experience difficulty swallowing and choking. They may also continually feel full and bloated and complain of heartburn. Many people with this condition will learn how to push foods around their esophagus with a finger. This helps to get food to move in the most effective way so it can pass into the stomach without pain or discomfort.

 

What is gastroenteritis?

Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of both the stomach and small intestine that can cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration. Gastroenteritis is usually caused by viruses, bacteria or parasites that irritate the stomach or intestines, according to Mayo Clinic. Infections can occur after eating contaminated food or drink. Cases of gastroenteritis are usually caused by bacteria, viruses, parasites or yeast found in food. Some people develop symptoms of an infection after drinking contaminated water.

Food poisoning is also known as a bacterial infection that affects the small intestine. The most common cause of food poisoning is "Escherichia coli," according to Mayo Clinic. Symptoms of E. coli food poisoning include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhea that lasts for five to 10 days or longer.

What are some important digestive disorders?

Any condition related to the stomach and the intestines can cause a problem with digestion. These include peptic ulcers and stomach ulcers, also known as gastric ulcers

Thrush is a yeast infection of the digestive tract caused by certain bacteria that produce an acid environment in the lower intestine. It causes a burning sensation in the rectum or anus.

 

What are the GI issues that can lead to constipation or diarrhea?

Constipation is the passing of fecal matter that is soft and difficult to pass. It occurs when the muscles of the large bowel are not working properly and waste doesn't move through them easily. Constipation may be due to laxative abuse, certain medications, or certain medical conditions. People with a medical condition called irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), also known as spastic colon or chronic idiopathic constipation, often experience constipation as one of their symptoms. IBS is called irritable bowel because people may have an increased sense of urgency (irritation) or pain in their intestines, which other people do not experience.

Diarrhea is the passage of fluid plus mucus or stool through the intestines. Diarrhea may occur after eating a large amount of food that causes liquid to pass quickly through the bowel. Or it may occur with certain infections, such as rotavirus, infectious diarrhea and Clostridium difficile.


What are some GI conditions?

The following conditions affect the digestive system:

Also, GI diseases are often associated with:

1. Blood disorders – including cancer, anemia and leukemia.

2. Congenital defects .

3. Environmental toxins.

4. Endocrine disorders .

5. Infections.

6. Neurologic diseases. 

7. Metabolic diseases. 

8. Pregnancy problems. 

9. Rheumatic conditions. 

10. Sleep disorders. 

11. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies. 

12. Waiting list diseases.

What are the GI issues that can lead to constipation or diarrhea?

Constipation is the passing of fecal matter that is soft and difficult to pass. It occurs when the muscles of the large bowel are not working properly and waste doesn't move through them easily. Constipation may be due to laxative abuse, certain medications, or certain medical conditions. People with a medical condition called irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), also known as spastic colon or chronic idiopathic constipation, often experience constipation as one of their symptoms. IBS is called irritable bowel because people may have an increased sense of urgency (irritation) or pain in their intestines, which other people do not experience.

Diarrhea is the passage of fluid plus mucus or stool through the intestines. Diarrhea may occur after eating a large amount of food that causes liquid to pass quickly through the bowel. Or it may occur with certain infections, such as rotavirus, infectious diarrhea and Clostridium difficile

 

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